June 2008


You want to talk about Free Dome and Change? This brother right here changed the game of Hip-Hop! I mean he changed the direction of how people was writing and reciting their rhymes. Foreal!! Nobody was doing it like him. That’s why he is held in such high regards when it comes to emceeing. Not to mention his metaphors. I myself have taken from the Rakim book, shit it was him who really got me interested in writing rhymes. Looking back at it, I could nearly understand what he was speaking on but I could innerstand it well. Blast from the past, Rakim “I ain’t no Joke”. FISKKK!!!!

Change is upon us people and I’m not talking about Obama. Today(these days) is a time where a lot of different views(i.e. idea’s, perspectives) and ways of life is being challenged. Some by outside forces that you feel you can’t control as well as those close to home like family and good friends. There are many ways to look at them. It could be offensive at times but ultimately it is up to you to determine it’s effect on you. Believe it or not, that’s the perception you control. And if you can control your perception… that’s a good start to a Free Dome! Enjoy! Oh, pay attention to definition  number two below. BLAMMMMM!!

 

SLAVE

Pronunciation:
\ˈslāv\
Function:
noun
Etymology:
Middle English sclave, from Anglo-French or Medieval Latin; Anglo-French esclave, from Medieval Latin sclavus, from Sclavus Slavic; from the frequent enslavement of Slavs in central Europe during the early Middle Ages
Date:
14th century
1 : a person held in servitude as the chattel of another2 : one that is completely subservient to a dominating influence3 : a device (as the printer of a computer) that is directly responsive to another4 : drudgetoiler
— slave adjective

 

A group that made a couple of hits during the 90’s. At the time I only liked about two joints but still… they will be with me until I move on. Here’s a quick bio:

 

Led by producer/vocalist/songwriter Jazzie B., Soul II Soul were one of the most innovative dance/R&B outfits of the late ’80s, creating a seductive, deep R&B that borrowed from Philly soul, disco, reggae, and ’80s hip-hop. Originally featuring Jazzie B., producer/arranger Nellee Hooper, and instrumentalist Philip “Daddae” Harvey, the musical collective came together in the late ’80s. The group had a residency at the Africa Centre in London’s Covent Garden, which led to a record contract with 10, a subsidiary of Virgin. Two singles, “Fairplay” and “Feel Free,” began to attract attention both in clubs and in the press.

 

Featuring the vocals of Caron Wheeler, Soul II Soul’s third single, “Keep on Movin’,” reached the U.K. Top Ten in March of 1989. Released in the summer of 1989, “Back to Life” also featured Wheeler and became another Top Ten hit. Soul II Soul released their debut album, Club Classics, Vol. 1, shortly afterward. The album was released in America under the title Keep on Movin’; both “Keep on Movin'” and “Get a Life” became substantial hits, propelling the album to double platinum status.

Wheeler left the group before the recording of the group’s second album, Vol. II: 1990 – A New Decade. The album debuted at number one in the U.K., yet it caught the group in a holding pattern. Hooper soon left the collective, leaving Jazzie B. to soldier on alone. Hooper went on to work with several of the most influential and popular acts of the early ’90s, including Massive Attack (Blue Lines), Björk (Debut and Post), Madonna (Bedtime Stories), and U2 (“Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me”). In 1992, Soul II Soul released Vol. III: Just Right, to both lukewarm reviews and sales. After the compilation Vol. IV: The Classic Singles, the group’s next studio album, Vol. V: Believe, appeared in 1995. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

 

Written by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

 

This is an Illustration that I do every week in the Nation wide newspaper “rolling out”. With suggestions from my two homies Goldie Gold and Senor Kaos, I decided to put them up… every week. Enjoy. BLAMMMM!!

Another Sambo definition. In fact… three more. HAAAAA!

 

sambo - Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Sambo \Sam"bo\, n. [Sp. zambo bandy-legged, the child of a negro
     and an Indian; prob. of African origin.]
     1. A negro; sometimes, the offspring of a black person and a
        mulatto; -- formerly used colloquially or with humorous
        intent, but now considered offensive or racist by
        African-Americans. [Derogatory and offensive]

     Note: A children's book named Little Black Sambo was at one
           time popular in elementary schools, but the book has
           been removed from reading lists in many American
           schools due to the development of a reduced acceptance
           of patronizing depictions of negros, as well as the
           negative associations of the word itself.
           [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

     2. In Central America, an Indian and negro half-breed, or
        mixed blood.
        [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

  Sambo \Sam"bo\, n. [Sp. zambo, sambo.]
     A colloquial or humorous appellation for a negro; sometimes,
     the offspring of a black person and a mulatto; a zambo.
     [1913 Webster]

sambo - Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  35 Moby Thesaurus words for "sambo":
     Cape Colored, Eurasian, cattalo, citrange, cross, crossbreed,
     griffe, half blood, half-bred, half-breed, half-caste, high yellow,
     hinny, hybrid, ladino, liger, mestee, mestiza, mestizo, metis,
     metisse, mixblood, mixed-blood, mongrel, mulatto, mule, mustee,
     octoroon, plumcot, quadroon, quintroon, tangelo, tigon, zebrass,
     zebrule

 

Cookin with Coolio!

It’s that time of the week peoples… Watermelon and Chicken Wednesday’s. We are gonna set it off with Big Homie Coolio. What in the hell does he have cookin up this week? BLAMMMMM!!

The Killa Illa put me on to this so I just had to put it up for Cacklin Tuesday’s!! HAAAA! Enjoy!

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